New Look at Old Tools: Take a Voyage with Google Earth

As the school year ends, most educators are taking a well-deserved break and taking time to recharge.  It's a time to slow down, rest, and gather new ideas for next school year. The following series is devoted to revisiting familiar tools and creating new ideas!

Google Earth is a tool that many of us are familiar with; however, how often do we use some of its most basic features? Simply visit Google Earth and choose the captain's wheel icon to access. 

The Voyager feature is loaded with dozens of educational field trips and games aimed at sharing the world with students! Here are some great voyages to take your students on!

Changing Forests

Imagine you want to teach your students about the consequences of disappearing forests and global warming. The Changing Forests voyage uses time-elapsed imagery to showcase how deforestation ravages the planet. 


Triangular Structures

How often do students ask you, "When will I need this?" The Triangular Structures tour helps you answer that exact question as you dive into real-life examples of one of the most powerful geometric shapes! The tour includes the Eifel Tower, The Louvre, and more! As you explore, students will learn why triangles are used so often in architecture. 




This is School

This Google Earth voyage takes you inside classrooms from all around the world. From London to the Himalayas, you will see where students learn (and sometimes the challenges they face) and gain a cultural appreciation of how learning occurs across cultures. 



Conclusion

Google Earth is a powerful tool for virtually traveling the world and exposes students to different cultures and perspectives. How will you use Google Earth in your classroom? The possibilities are endless! 







Matt Bergman (2023)









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