Tuesday, March 30, 2021

How Can I Use the Seesaw Blog Feature?

The Seesaw blog feature is a great way to provide students with an authentic audience on the web while keeping students safe! The blog feature can be public on the web and password protected. 

The blog feature is a great way to show exemplary work, share class news and events, and practice valuable digital citizenship skills like posting to online discussions and practice commenting on another classmate's work. 

The teacher is always in control! 

  • The blog can be password protected to add another layer of security
  • You have ultimate control over what is posted or not posted. If you need to, you can unpost something too!
  • Students can suggest something to "post" something to the blog; however, you have ultimate control on whether or not it is approved or not
  • All comments require your approval
  • You can turn the blog feature on / off

Want to see how it works? Check out my video below





Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Crash Course on Creating a Wakelet Collection

 If you have never used Wakelet before, I highly recommend using this tool to organize information, create assignments, or create a playlist.  Want to see my Bread Winner Wakelet? Click here. 

Crash Course on Wakelet 

Check out my video for a crash course on creating a Wakelet Collection! 


Why Do I Like Wakelet? 

There are several reasons why I like this tool! First, Wakelet gives you a variety of tools to share, such as websites, videos, write your own text, connect other apps (i.e. Google Classroom, Teams, etc), add photos, and add PDF's. 


Secondly, the Immersive Reader feature is amazing! Students can press a button and have written text read to them! What a great accessibility tool!


Finally, when you upload the link to a YouTube video on Wakelet, it gets rid of the advertisements and creates a smooth platform for viewing videos. 



Monday, March 15, 2021

Virtual Measurement Activity in Google Slides

Did you know that you could use Google Slides as a tool for virtual manipulatives? I was recently in a 4th-grade classroom, where we wanted to help students understand how to convert units of measurement like ounces to pounds and pounds to tons. 

We developed the following Google Slides presentation to help students. Students are asked to guess how many ounces are in a pound, then they are asked to drag the one-ounce boxes into the one-pound container. When they are finished, they will record their answer in the answer box. 

Feel free to access your own copy of this presentation here! 

Want to see how it works? Check out my video